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DC Nation

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Re: DC Nation

Postby Sabrblade » Sat Aug 03, 2013 9:27 pm

Hoo, boy! Was that an episode!

We got our first glimpse at the League of Assassins, who currently seem to be led by Lady Shiva, with Silver Monkey as her field commander.

The episode focuses on Batman and Tatsu each separately trying to protect Dr. Jason Burr (who becomes Kobra in the comics) from being murdered by ninja agents of the League, resulting in Burr being put under the security of Wayne Manor, which Silver Monkey and his assassins infiltrate under Lady Shiva's orders. There, they encounter Tatsu, whom Silver Monkey recognizes as a traitor to the League and tries kill her as well as Burr. Though Batman manages to help fend them all off, a few things of importance were either revealed or reiterated in this episode:
1. Tatsu is the former League of Assassins member "Katana" (which was already known to viewers keeping up with the news about the show and with the comics)
2. Tatsu stole a sacred weapon called the "Soultaker Sword" when she betrayed the League.
3. Tatsu is willing to cross the line into murdering her opponents if pressed.
4. She still has yet to discover Bruce's identity as Batman.
5. Bruce may not be aware of her League background.

And with the appearance of the League of Assassins in this episode, it's possible that they may reappear periodically throughout the season as an ongoing antagonist group, in which case would mean several things were seeded in this episode, such as the League trying to get their sword back and get their revenge on Tatsu, Burr's potential eventual conversion to Kobra, and who knows, maybe we could get Ra's al Ghul as a sort of season finale villain to cap off season 1 on the long run.
"When there's gold feathers, punch behind you!!"

“Critics who treat 'adult' as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.” -- C.S. Lewis
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Re: DC Nation

Postby Sabrblade » Sat Aug 10, 2013 5:11 pm

I'm really digging how this show manages to cover multiple plotlines simultaneously with each episode.

On one hand, we have Batman dealing with the latest creep or thug causing trouble in Gotham City. This time, it's Humphry Dumpler, alias "Humpty Dumpty", who used to be an accountant for the mob and supposed to testify against crime boss Tobias Whale, but was assaulted en route to the courthouse and driven insane by the attack. He is not evil, but mentally unstable, to the point of taking matters into his own hands by kidnapping both Whale and Lt. Gordon in an attempt to end the war between the mob and the GCPD, which he feels the two have dragged him into the middle of, by having both of them killed. Dumpler is portrayed as both sympathetic and tragic, yet also mad and borderline psychotic.

He also proves that Gotham City seems to have a lot of physically deformed/disfigured people living in it, with Dumpler, Whale, several of Whale's thugs, nd pretty much anyone in this show who has an abnormal design.

On the other hand, we have the goings on at Wayne Manor, with Tatsu recovering the Soultaker Sword and Alfred revealing that he knew of its existence. They each knew about the sword because it was a priority for both MI6 and the CIA, with both factions having been searching for it for years. During Tatsu's days as a CIA agent, she came to learn of it having falling into the hands of the League of Assassins, which she infiltrated as a double agent for the CIA, in hopes to find a lead on the international criminal Ra's al Ghul. Upon learning the sword's true power (being able to suck people's souls out of their bodies), however, she felt that it was too dangerous for any major authority to possess (including the CIA). Instead of returning to her superiors with the sword, she took it and went MIA. She's been in hinding ever since, which is when she took the job at Wayne Manor.

And yes, they pronounced the name of Ra's al Ghul correctly, as "Raysh" instead of "Rahz". Yay!
"When there's gold feathers, punch behind you!!"

“Critics who treat 'adult' as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.” -- C.S. Lewis
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Re: DC Nation

Postby Sabrblade » Tue Oct 01, 2013 9:16 pm

Ra's al Ghul is upon us.
"When there's gold feathers, punch behind you!!"

“Critics who treat 'adult' as a term of approval, instead of as a merely descriptive term, cannot be adult themselves. To be concerned about being grown up, to admire the grown up because it is grown up, to blush at the suspicion of being childish; these things are the marks of childhood and adolescence. And in childhood and adolescence they are, in moderation, healthy symptoms. Young things ought to want to grow. But to carry on into middle life or even into early manhood this concern about being adult is a mark of really arrested development. When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.” -- C.S. Lewis
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